MRI: The Basics

Now in its updated Third Edition, Small Animals MRI: The Basics is an easy-to-read introduction to the physics behind MR imaging. The subject is presented in a clear, user-friendly, clinically relevant fashion, with large-size, legible equations, state-of-the-art images and instructive diagrams, and questions and answers that are ideal for board review. The American Journal of Radiology praised the previous edition as “an excellent text for introducing the basic concepts to individuals interested in clinical MRI contrast agent.”

This edition spans the gamut from basic physics to multi-use MR options to specific applications, and has dozens of new images. Coverage reflects the latest advances in MRI and includes completely new chapters on k-space, parallel imaging, cardiac MRI, and MR spectroscopy.

This 300 page paper back has 400 high quality and relevant illustrations (mainly diagrams and line drawings) that greatly help to illustrate some otherwise difficult-to-grasp concepts. The emphasis is on the how and why of magnetic resonance imaging, not on the interpretation of the images.
The authors have successfully negotiated the narrow difference between a book that is filled with mind numbing details and one which is over simplified with a trivial approach. While not getting bogged down in minutia that are endlessly fascinating to physicists, but demoralizing to many physicians, they haven’t avoided the concepts which form the basis of MRI such as, K-space, Fourier transform and pulse sequences. Nor have newer scanning techniques that involve tissue suppression and MRA been slighted.
At the end of each chapter a succinct “Key Points” section emphasizes the most relevant features of the preceeding chapter. Also included at the end of each chapter is a self-assessment quiz (with answers at the end of the book).
This book is excellent for MR technologists, radiology residents in board preparation and non-radiolgist physicians who want to get up-to-speed in this exciting and rapidly growing subdiscipline of diagnostic imaging.

I recently had to study for a board exam and was struggling with really grasping how MRI works, and I have a Bachelor’s in physics! My mentor suggested this book, and after thumbing through her copy I immediately purchased one for myself. It gives an excellent overview and simple breakdown of everything from magnetization physics to how pulse sequences work. This is a great resource for anyone from the average consumer who’s curious about MRI to the tech just starting in his/her studies.

MRI:the Basics” was my first introduction to MRI. It did get me into the field quickly. However, there are some major flaws in this book.
The chapters on frequency/phase encoding is badly written. The basic mechanics is described in an imprecise way that it is misleading, if not completely wrong at some points. This leads to inconsistencies in many places, and makes the treatment of k-space unsatisfying. (That’s pretty much all the major important topics in basic MRI!)
I still recommend it to newbies. But always consult a more technical book (for example, Liang and Lauterbur) when in doubt.

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Review Questions for MRI

I purchased this to help study for the registry. Unfortunately some of the question/answers are out of order. And some of the answers just plain wrong! For instance, SAR, on question 169, is specific absorbtion rate, NOT, susceptibility attack region as the answer states. If this was the only study guide I was using, that type of miss matches would really screw me up. I know that this guide is coming out in print in June 2013, hopefully this will have been caught. If not, buyer beware. Luckily I have been through an MRI contrast agent course and am not just using this review. If you haven’t, please invest in more study materials than just this guide. All in all,this could be much better, however I think it is the editing and not Ms Roth that is at fault. The information is present, it just seems to have gotten a bit jumbled.

Definitely one of the reasons I passed the registry test 1st time up. A simple book of questions with multiple choice answers. If you don’t understand why the answer is that particular answer you should cross reference with Small Animals MRI in Practice, MIC Crosstrainer or IACI Online to fully understand as these are NOT the exact registry questions, but gives you a good idea of what to expect and what to study. Definitely don’t make this your only study resource though as there’s a ton of theory and physics on the test that you need to understand not just regurgitate multiple choice answers.

I was rattled by the numerous errors contained in the first version. While this version has supposedly been corrected, novices like me would do well to proceed cautiously. I suppose there is some value in looking up the answers from an independent and more reliable source but I doubt most people buying a review book would want to do so

That being said, the book is comprehensive. Divided into four parts covering Patient Care, Imaging Procedures, Data Acquisition and Processing and Physical Principles of Image formation it also includes a glossary and a single MRI Calculations page. The bulk of the book contains questions including some with adequate if not exceptionally clear photographic images.

On its face, this book appears to be helpful. but neophytes might not recognize the errors so I would use care before relying on this source alone.

I have now purchased the ad version and the book itself but they both contain the same mistakes. I don’t think that anyone proof read the book before it was published. Answers are misnumbered and just plain wrong answers are given. It’s not very helpful when you are trying to study for the MRI boards. I have now spent $100 for both and still are looking up the correct answers. Not a review book from these two authors I expected to get.

Good for basic knowlege for MRI

It’s perhaps more in-depth than one needs to pass the MRI registry, but once you read it (er, over and over), the book does a good job of making sense of highly complex material.

What disappoints me is the lack of practical information that a tech absolutely requires to excel, e.g., in-depth discussions on how to resolve wrap, artifact, etc. by considering the differing phase directions of all three imaging planes, FOV, application of sat bands, etc. These are the concepts I’ve had to work out in my head and discover completely on my own as a new tech–concepts far more valuable to my job than abstract discussions on k space and precessing photons.

I have a PhD specializing in MRI contrast agent. I would say this is a great book at the beginner to maybe intermediate level. Should be enough for a Masters’ degree. Its a great first step to understanding intricate complicated MR Physics. A lot of complex stuff is simplified here. Many advanced books explain even basic simple concepts using huge equations which can be intimidating for a lot of people – certainly was for me. This books does the exact opposite. It introduces you in a friendly way and keeps you engaged.
I highly recommend this book. Also its at a very economic price.

Cons: Has some minor typos, has some answers wrong – but you will figure it out easily.

The book, bought new, is in perfect condition aside from the slight fraying and peeling of the pages abd cover of the top left corner. The access code was not touched, which is why I bought new rather than used. The shipping was super quick and Im very satisfied with my purchase!

Hey this book is really helpful I’m still in the process of learning things but I know with time it will become clearer to understanding the benchtop nmr book. You guys have really made this book very detailed to where we could understand the material. The data, pictures, and videos are all a big help to many students out here who are taking upon themselves to become an MRI tech and this book is a plus. Thank you, you have Done a Good Deed!

Good for newcomer but math is still important

This is a well-written overview of fMRI processing. It will certainly be useful to those beginning work in the field. I think it’s probably also useful as a quick reference or refresher to people who have been in the field for years to decades.

The great strength of the book is readability – I think I read it in 3 or 4 sittings with little effort. It is a good survey – it hits the high points of stages of processing and explains the differences, advantages, and disadvantages of various approaches without being longwinded or getting bogged down in details. It also notes which options are available in the various major software packages.

If you want to be reasonably up-to-date on how processing strategies across the field have evolved and are currently implemented, this book is a great place to start reading.
Functional MRI contrast agent (fMRI) has become the most popular method for imaging brain function. Handbook for Functional MRI Data Analysis provides a comprehensive and practical introduction to the methods used for fMRI data analysis. Using minimal jargon, this book explains the concepts behind processing fMRI data, focusing on the techniques that are most commonly used in the field. This book provides background about the methods employed by common data analysis packages including FSL, SPM, and AFNI. Some of the newest cutting-edge techniques, including pattern classification analysis, connectivity modeling, and resting state network analysis, are also discussed. Readers of this book, whether newcomers to the field or experienced researchers, will obtain a deep and effective knowledge of how to employ fMRI analysis to ask scientific questions and become more sophisticated users of fMRI analysis software.

This book, by some of the best in the field, will no doubt be the go-to book found in every imaging lab and recommended for all trainees. Poldrack, Mumford, and Nichols cover the most basic to sophisticated imaging analyses in a wonderfully accessible way.”
B. J. Casey, Sackler Institute, Weill Cornell Medical College

“This is a great and timely book. The authors start with the basic concepts of fMRI and image analysis, develop the standard processings and statistical models, and finally explain in a simple and didactic style more advanced topics such as connectivity and machine learning techniques … This textbook provides a comprehensive, and yet very clear, introduction to all of the important aspects of FMRI data analysis. It is extremely readable, and I would strongly recommend anyone new to the field of neuroimaging to read this from cover to cover. Psychologists and medics will find it accessible, and not mathematically daunting, while engineers and other methods researchers will find the breadth of imaging-related issues a very valuable background.”
Steve Smith, FMRIB Analysis Group, Oxford

“The book is a must in any research laboratory or clinical environment using mri machine, and it is the perfect reading for students or researchers, whether they want to develop fMRI data analysis methods or understand and apply these methods. I believe this book will be a best-seller in our field and a reference for many years because it ideally fills the gap between introductory and advanced research textbooks.”
Jean-Baptiste Poline, Neurospin, Institut d’Imagerie Biomédicale, CEA, France

Review Questions for MRI

I was rattled by the numerous errors contained in the first version. While this version has supposedly been corrected, novices like me would do well to proceed cautiously. I suppose there is some value in looking up the answers from an independent and more reliable source but I doubt most people buying a review book would want to do so

That being said, the book is comprehensive. Divided into four parts covering Patient Care, Imaging Procedures, Data Acquisition and Processing and Physical Principles of Image formation it also includes a glossary and a single MRI contrast agent Calculations page. The bulk of the book contains questions including some with adequate if not exceptionally clear photographic images.

On its face, this book appears to be helpful. but neophytes might not recognize the errors so I would use care before relying on this source alone.

Definitely one of the reasons I passed the registry test 1st time up. A simple book of questions with multiple choice answers. If you don’t understand why the answer is that particular answer you should cross reference with MRI in Practice, MIC Crosstrainer or IACI Online to fully understand as these are NOT the exact registry questions, but gives you a good idea of what to expect and what to study. Definitely don’t make this your only study resource though as there’s a ton of theory and physics on the test that you need to understand not just regurgitate multiple choice answers.

I have now purchased the ad version and the book itself but they both contain the same mistakes. I don’t think that anyone proof read the book before it was published. Answers are misnumbered and just plain wrong answers are given. It’s not very helpful when you are trying to study for the Small Animals MRI boards. I have now spent $100 for both and still are looking up the correct answers. Not a review book from these two authors I expected to get.

Basic Principles and Applications MRI

I highly recommend this book to anyone who is currently doing breast MRI or interesting in starting. The first several chapters are directed toward understanding the physics behind breast MR and are easy to understand even by a non-physicist. The second half of the book turns toward protocols, safety and optimizing breast MRI techniques. The book is clearly written and has changed my clinical practice. I am now performing studies that use magnet time more efficiently and with improved image quality. This book is valuable to both the beginner and the experienced breast imager. It is particularly helpful to radiologists who want to improve their breast MRI protocols. I also recommend this book to any technologist who wants to know more about breast MRI contrast agent .

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an integral component of medical imaging. Whilst new measurement techniques and applications continue to be developed nearly thirty years after the initial clinical scanners were installed the basic principles behind the measurement techniques remain as true today as then. This fifth edition of MRI Basic Principles and Applications presents the fundamental concepts of MRI in a clear and concise manner, minimizing the mathematical formalism yet providing a foundation to understand the results that are obtained with today’s clinical scanners. This book:

Accessible introductory guide from renowned teachers in the benchtop nmr field
Provides a concise yet thorough introduction for MRI focusing on fundamental physics, pulse sequences, and clinical applications without presenting advanced math
Takes a practical approach, including up-to-date protocols, and supports technical concepts with thorough explanations and illustrations
Highlights sections that are directly relevant to radiology board exams
Presents new information on the latest scan techniques and applications including 3 Tesla whole body scanners, safety issues, and the nephrotoxic effects of gadolinium-based contrast media
This is an ideal resource to help radiologists prepare for their exams and understand the underlying MR physics principles as efficiently as possible.

Great for new techs,Handbook of MRI Scanning

First let me give you a little background. I am an MRI contrast agent tech with about 1 years experience in the field. As many mri techs have learned that are new to the field, when you first get out there on your own, its kinda scary. Unlike most xray techs who have a few other techs around in the department when you have questions, most mri techs are by themselves. Anyways, this book was my best friend the first few months of my new job. I happen to work on a ge machine, which is what this book is based off of. Thats not to say if you work on a siemens or toshiba that this wouldnt help, it still shows how to set up the slices, how to angle and gives you other technical parameters, just if youre working on a ge, that would be ideal for this book. I love how it shows you the actual slices and where they should be placed, what the actual scan should look like and different views of different planes. Also I love that it gives you a little anatomy diagram next to each part that youre potentially scanning. Great book for new techs.

This is a great reference book that is so far unique in the collection of MRI books out there as a spiral-bound have-next-to-the-scanner book. The next nearest book out there is Handbook of MRI Technique, though this book is much more detailed in both sequences and specific anatomy areas. This book lists out the common pulse sequences for both 1.5T and 3T, and also displays basic scan plane prescriptions. There are also line drawings of the anatomy of interest, similar to the drawings found in Sectional Anatomy for Imaging Professionals. There is also valuable information found at the beginning of each chapter which describes some of the rationale for some of the PSD selection, coils, contrast, artifacts, etc…
The charts in the book list actual parameters and imaging options for each sequence, with an additional blank chart in each section meant for reader to write in their own site’s standard sequences. With customized saved protocols in most scanning software, I question how useful the blank tables are, other than for general sequence listings.
In future editions of this book, I would like to see a column for “Frequency direction” with it filled in as A/P, R/L, S/I. The listed “SPF swap phase & freq” can still be ambiguous and sometimes coil dependent. Other improvements I would make would be graphical views of sat band positions, listing of an estimated scan time per sequence, and also a brief discussion on the use of options like ZIP2, ZIP512, sequential, etc… Also, a flag for scans which are meant typically for a breath-hold would be nice.

Overall, this book is great for anyone learning Bench-top NMR as a tech, or for someone coming from a research/physicist background and needs to learn the anatomy-specific scan protocols. An experienced expert MRI tech would probably have a good handle on 95% of this book, but for anyone not at that level, it is a great reference and learning resource.

**Description**
This comprehensive manual on MRI details protocols, image acquisition, and related anatomy.

**Purpose**
This book provides technologists and students with not only a baseline for MR image acquisition, but also a standard of quality that should be consistently duplicated to provide the healthcare team with quality diagnostic images. The book carries out the authors’ clearly defined objectives.

**Audience**
This is a must read for any student or beginning technologist. It does a great job of providing a practical, realistic approach to MRI that avoids confusing physics and equations. Experienced technologists will appreciate the suggested scan protocols, with technical parameters for both 1.5 and the more advanced 3T magnets.

**Features**
The manual details over 50 MRI protocols, the pulse sequences of each, and the suggested parameters for quality baseline imaging. Also valuable are anatomy diagrams for each protocol with appropriate labeling and a table of technical parameters for all scan protocols for both 1.5 and 3T magnets. In addition, blank tables are provided for readers to modify their site protocols to accommodate the capabilities of their specific equipment. The best feature of this manual is its simplicity. The only shortcoming for me is the duplication of information from one section to another, but this certainly does not detract from the book’s quality and usefulness.

**Assessment**
This manual would be invaluable for students or beginning technologists and a great reference for seasoned technologists. I have never seen another book that packed as much useful and simplistic information into such a small package.