Must Have for Protein NMR Spectroscopists

This book is one of the best NMR texts I have read. That being said, it is also one of the most challenging NMR texts I have read (it’s a tie between this and Intro to SSNMR by Melinda Duer). This book is definitely not a beginners book, so if you are just starting to learn about NMR buy something more basic like Spin Dynamics by Levitt or Understanding NMR analyzer by Keeler and read it first. I have yet to find a protein NMR text out there as good as this one. The detail in which Dr. Palmer goes into is fantastic while still being very understandable. More than anything I appreciate the depth in which he covers the different experiment types. This is a must have for anyone doing protein NMR work.

It covers advanced ideas. The book authors are alphabetical, and anyone in the field refers to it as the Palmer book…He sacrificed his research as an asst. prof to write such a great book. Great discussion of Bloch and how T1 and T2 were originally proposed. I recommend this book along side the Malcom Levitt book (Spin Dynamics). The amazon copy of this book has different paper than other copies in my lab. It is thicker and heavier, but better for writing on or annotating. Other copies in the lab with the older paper have a hard time writing on it. The binding is real crappy, I left it in the lab with that huge orgo encyclopedia sitting on the first 20 pages so it would stay open. I would have really appreciated a paperback version, but they don’t make one. Note there is significant differences between the first and second editions, don’t cheap out you will be sorry. Get this one.

This is the new standard for Protein NMR spectroscopists (the old one being Ernst). Everyone I’ve met who uses NMR application in biology has nothing but praise for this book. It’s not a perfect book and has some weakness, especially in the modelling portions. The math derivations are clear but the authors do not connect back to the physical phenomenon. I would recommend keeping a QM book nearby as a reference. However, this book is well written overall and very complete.
Important new techniques and applications of NMR spectroscopy have emerged since the first edition of this extremely successful book was published in 1996. The second edition includes new sections describing measurement and use of residual dipolar coupling constants for structure determination, TROSY and deuterium labeling for application to large macromolecules, and experimental techniques for characterizing conformational dynamics. In addition, the treatments of instrumentation and signal acquisition, field gradients, multidimensional spectroscopy, and structure calculation are updated and enhanced.
People who start they adventure with the protein NMR spectroscopy should learn from the old Wuthrich’s book first, which was published in 1986. Beginner should not start his adventure with the protein NMR spectroscopy from working with the multidimentional spectra only. In my opinion man should properly understand 2D NMR spectroscopy of different biomolecules first.

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Excellent introduction to nmr theory

Used in concert with complementary analytical techniques such as light spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the most powerful tool for the determination of organic structure. This book fosters a real-world understanding of NMR spectroscopy and how it works without burying the reader in technical details and physical and mathematical formalism. With an accessible, clear style and approach, benchtop NMR Spectroscopy Explained:

Introduces readers to modern NMR spectroscopy as it is applied to the analysis of organic compounds and biomolecules

Minimizes complicated theory and focuses on the practical aspects of NMR spectroscopy

Provides comprehensive coverage of how NMR spectroscopy experiments actually work and how to optimize them on the spectrometer

Provides examples of every experiment, with detailed interpretation of data

Presents essential descriptive theory in mainly nonmathematical terms

The guide starts with a basic model and expands it one step at a time, complete with experiments and examples, helping readers who are not experts in physics or physical chemistry to develop an empowering understanding of even the most complex biological NMR spectroscopy techniques. It is an ideal reference for professionals in industry and academia who use NMR analyzer technology, NMR facility managers, and upper-level undergraduates and graduate students in organic chemistry, biochemistry, pharmacology, biophysics, and engineering.

Moreover, cutting-edge examples and applications throughout the texts show the relevance of the chemistry being described to current research and industry. The learning features provided, including questions at the end of every chapter and online multiple-choice questions, encourage active learning and promote understanding. Furthermore, frequent diagrams, margin notes, and glossary definitions all help to enhance a student’s understanding of these essential areas of chemistry. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance offers a concise and accessible introduction to the physical principles of liquid-state NMR, a powerful technique for probing molecular structures. Examples, applications, and exercises are provided throughout to enable beginning undergraduates to get to grips with this important analytical technique. Online Resource Centre The Online Resource Centre to accompany Nuclear Magnetic Resonance features: For registered adopters of the text: * Figures from the book available to download For students: * Multiple-choice questions for self-directed learning * Full worked solutions to the end-of-chapter exercises

How To Collect NMR Spectra for Optimal Performace

In order to perform optimally, it is best if the sample preparation and the NMR system for EDU data acquisition are performed in a manner similar to that used to prepare and collect the reference NMR system for research spectra used in Bayesil’s spectral library. Using different spectral preparation and collection conditions will compromise the performance, particularly the quantification accuracy. Here we describe the recommended methods that Bayesil users should follow when preparing biological samples and collecting NMR spectra of those samples.

All samples should have been either stored frozen or stored at 4 °C prior to use. Cerebrospinal fluid should be spun down to remove particulate matter and its pH checked (or adjusted) to ensure that it is between pH 6.8-7.4. More attention must be paid for the sample preparation of serum or plasma because of the high concentration of proteins in these samples. Proteins in the biofluid sample of interest must be removed by passing it through a pre-rinsed (washed 7X) Amicon Ultra-0.5 3000 MWCO filter at 4 °C using a centrifuge (12,000 g force). Unwanted protein signals are particularly problematic with serum and plasma and ultrafiltration is currently the best method of removing these signals without altering the chemical composition of the biofluid. After the protein filtration step has been completed, the sample may be placed into a NMR tube. If Shegemi tubes are used, 285 μL of sample will be needed. For regular thin walled 5 mm NMR tubes, 570 μL of sample will be needed. With respect to pre-rinsing the Amicon filters, sterile double-distilled water or its equivalent should be used. Rinsing should be done at least seven times to ensure any residual glycerol is removed. Otherwise glycerol concentrations will be erroneously elevated in the biofluid sample.

It is recommended that users check the pH of each sample prior to spectrum collection to ensure the pH is near 7.0. Otherwise the global fitting routine will produce larger errors than reported. The physiologic pH of blood and CSF is between 7.3 and 7.4. Plasma and serum generally have large buffering capacities, thus pH adjustment is rarely problematic. Bayesil is designed to work well with samples having a pH range between 6.8 and 7.5. However, the pH may vary due to sample handling or disease state and adequate optimization of the pH prior to data collection cannot be stressed enough. Larger concentrations of sodium phosphate than 50 mM may be necessary if your sample’s pH is not adequately controlled. Thus, checking your sample’s pH beforehand can alleviate many potential problems.

The necessary volumes and buffer recipes required for sample preparation are shown below in Table 1 and Table 2 respectively.

NMR Spectroscopy Explained: Simplified Theory, Applications and Examples for Organic Chemistry and Structural Biology

This book along with “Structure Determination of Organic Compounds” by Pretsch, Buhlmann, and Affolter and maybe “200 and More NMR experiments” by Berger and Braun are currently the only NMR books worth owning. Skip the rest.

I’ve been working with NMR analyzer for over 11 years and over the years have acquired numerous books on the subject. This book is hands down the best on the subject. The author clearly explains everything, where other books throw up a graph/spectrum/equation and expect you to figure it out magically at times. Areas I’ve been confused on for years suddenly all make sense.

Initially I wanted to write a review for this book after I finish the whole book. However, since the publication of this book, I have noticed that nobody has ever written a review. I have only finished approximately 400 pages but I want to let people to know that this is clearest exposition on modern nmr spectroscopy I have ever come across. I have read a number of nmr books. These include the following

J.D. Roberts “ABC of FT NMR”
T. Claridge “High Resolution NMR spectroscopy in organic chemistry”
J. Sanders ” Modern NMR spectroscopy”
H. Friebolin “Basic One- and Two-Dimenionsal NMR”

None of the above is as good as this book. The one that comes close to this is Friebolin’s book. However, it is not as detail and does not cover topics such as operator formalism and density matrix. This book also covers the basic theoretical principles and presented in a very lucid way. I enjoy reading this book tremendously.

Dec 14, 2009. It has been almost 2 years since I wrote the initial review. Since then, I have the opportunity to read the whole book a second ti

I’ve been working with NMR for over 11 years and over the years have acquired numerous books on the subject. This book is hands down the best on the subject. The author clearly explains everything, where other books throw up a graph/spectrum/equation and expect you to figure it out magically at times. Areas I’ve been confused on for years suddenly all make sense.

This book along with “Structure Determination of Organic Compounds” by Pretsch, Buhlmann, and Affolter and maybe “200 and More NMR experiments” by Berger and Braun are currently the only NMR books worth owning. Skip the rest.

Initially I wanted to write a review for this book after I finish the whole book. However, since the publication of this book, I have noticed that nobody has ever written a review. I have only finished approximately 400 pages but I want to let people to know that this is clearest exposition on modern nmr spectroscopy I have ever come across. I have read a number of nmr books. These include the following

J.D. Roberts “ABC of FT NMR”
T. Claridge “High Resolution NMR spectroscopy in organic chemistry”
J. Sanders ” Modern NMR spectroscopy”
H. Friebolin “Basic One- and Two-Dimenionsal NMR”

None of the above is as good as this book. The one that comes close to this is Friebolin’s book. However, it is not as detail and does not cover topics such as operator formalism and density matrix. This book also covers the basic theoretical principles and presented in a very lucid way. I enjoy reading this book tremendously.

Dec 14, 2009. It has been almost 2 years since I wrote the initial review. Since then, I have the opportunity to read the whole book a second time. My opinion of this book remains the same. If you really want to understand NMR, you cannot go wrong with this book.

I’ve always found NMR to be extremely difficult but when I got this book, it really helped me to understand how to read and analyze NMR spectra. I also had the great honor of having the author of this book as my professor recently and the guy really knows his stuff and is great at conveying his knowledge. So if you never understood NMR or don’t really understand it that much, or just want a great book about NMR, this is the book for you and you can trust in the fact that the author knows his stuff. I know this book is costly, but trust me you won’t regret it at all!

me. My opinion of this book remains the same. If you really want to understand NMR, you cannot go wrong with this book.

I’ve always found NMR to be extremely difficult but when I got this book, it really helped me to understand how to read and analyze NMR spectra. I also had the great honor of having the author of this book as my professor recently and the guy really knows his stuff and is great at conveying his knowledge. So if you never understood NMR or don’t really understand it that much, or just want a great book about spin finish NMR analyzer, this is the book for you and you can trust in the fact that the author knows his stuff. I know this book is costly, but trust me you won’t regret it at all!

PET and Mass Spectrometry Experience

I am a grad student with PET and Mass spectrometry experience. Just wanted to dabble a little bit with NMR analyzer to further my postdoc .
Good side :
1.Very thorough. Everything is explained in great detail. You don’t need to have a very good math background to begin with.
2.figures are great and carefully drawn. They assisted my understanding greatly.
3.No buzz words, no weird comparisons. The “English” is very easy to understand.
Bad side :
1. Did not stimulate much of the critical thinking, lacks real life case studies
2. A little bit too lengthy in words. After reading the first two chapters, I started to skip words but only focused on figures and italic comments, and it worked better for me.
3. No answers for the exercise problems. The problems are not too hard though.

Keeler’s book is a very clear exposition of the physical basis and quantum mechanical underpinnings of modern NMR experiments. Because it is fundamentally based on the quantum mechanics, it is, I feel, a better introduction to heteronuclear NMR than the popular book by Claridge. At the same time, Keeler avoids the dense pages of mathematics that can make Cavanagh et al.’s excellent book intimidating to students who are not experts on quantum mechanics. An additional plus for me was Keeler’s refreshingly clear description of the physical origins of T2 relaxation.

At the same time, there are some deficiencies here. Keeler does not go into chemical exchange effects in any depth, and I do not believe he mentions REX at all. There is also no discussion of residual dipolar couplings, the model-free dynamics formalism, or diffusion experiments. Pulsed-field gradients and phase-cycling are presented almost as an afterthought. The discusisons of coherence order and raising/lowering operators leave something to be desired and the later chapters in which they appear are structured awkwardly. Keeler deals exclusively with dipolar systems in liquids, limitations that may make this text inappropriate for some labs.

That said, for someone who’s had some exposure to NMR (in, say, an organic chemistry course) this is an excellent, clear tour of some theoretical NMR basics that can provide a useful framework for approaching more comprehensive texts. Graduate students without a stong background in physical chemistry who intend to perform advanced work in NMR may find this book particularly helpful.