NMR Spectroscopy Explained

This is the best all around benchtop NMR text I have come across. Jacobsen does a great job of explaining the vast array of topics in NMR ranging from the nuclear magnetism and pulse sequences to biological NMR. It is very well written, easy to read and follow, while still going into great amounts of detail.

For those who do not enjoy heavy amounts of differential equations and linear algebra, then you will appreciate this book as there is just enough math to aid the written explanations, but not so much as to make your head spin. This book also has one of the best explanations/discussions on multi-dimensional techniques commonly used in organic and biological chemistry.

There is one specific area where I find this book is somewhat lacking, the discussion on T1, T2 and NOE which is fairly rudimentary. It is more than sufficient for those new to the topic or working on small molecules, but does not offer much past that in my opinion. Also, if you are looking for a better understanding in solid state NMR, this is not the book for you. I would highly recommend this book for anyone wanting to learn more about NMR analyzer.

NMR Spectroscopy Explained : Simplified Theory, Applications and Examples for Organic Chemistry and Structural Biology provides a fresh, practical guide to NMR for both students and practitioners, in a clearly written and non-mathematical format. It gives the reader an intermediate level theoretical basis for understanding laboratory applications, developing concepts gradually within the context of examples and useful experiments.
Introduces students to modern NMR as applied to analysis of organic compounds.
Presents material in a clear, conversational style that is appealing to students.
Contains comprehensive coverage of how NMR experiments actually work.
Combines basic ideas with practical implementation of the spectrometer.
Provides an intermediate level theoretical basis for understanding laboratory experiments.
Develops concepts gradually within the context of examples and useful experiments.
Introduces the product operator formalism after introducing the simpler (but limited) vector model.

Initially I wanted to write a review for this book after I finish the whole book. However, since the publication of this book, I have noticed that nobody has ever written a review. I have only finished approximately 400 pages but I want to let people to know that this is clearest exposition on modern nmr spectroscopy I have ever come across. I have read a number of nmr books. These include the following

J.D. Roberts “ABC of FT NMR”
T. Claridge “High Resolution NMR spectroscopy in organic chemistry”
J. Sanders ” Modern NMR spectroscopy”
H. Friebolin “Basic One- and Two-Dimenionsal NMR”

None of the above is as good as this book. The one that comes close to this is Friebolin’s book. However, it is not as detail and does not cover topics such as operator formalism and density matrix. This book also covers the basic theoretical principles and presented in a very lucid way. I enjoy reading this book tremendously.

Dec 14, 2009. It has been almost 2 years since I wrote the initial review. Since then, I have the opportunity to read the whole book a second time. My opinion of this book remains the same. If you really want to understand NMR, you cannot go wrong with this book.

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Structural Biology: Practical NMR Applications

This is an impressive and detailed book for anyone who wants to know NMR analyzer. I found in this book all what I need about protein NMR from basic level up to most advanced triple-resonance experiments. This textbook (or reference book) is helpful for all levels of students and experts. After reading through the book, I feel like I am an NMR expert because the book not only teaches the new thing I did not know but also summarizes what I already knew. I showed it to my friends and they all like it just by looking at the table of contents. I totally agree with the reviewer’s comments printed on the book cover:

“This is the first totally thorough book on the subject…” by Lawrence J. Berliner, University of Denver

“While NMR treatises abound, there exists no single text that provides both the information necessary to understand the experiments and processes, as well as the practical details for their successful implementation. This considerable gap in the literature is now happily bridged by Quincy Teng’s timely contribution.” By Gerd N. La Mar, University of California, Davis.

This book clearly illustrates the major aspects of NMR spectroscopy, instrumentation and applications in a relatively simple language without the use of complicated mathematics. The questions at the end of each section reflect the main points of the contents. It can be used as a self study textbook for beginners, as well as a reference for teaching and research in NMR spectroscopy.

This textbook begins with an overview of benchtop NMR development and applications in biological systems. It describes recent developments in instrument hardware and methodology. Chapters highlight the scope and limitation of NMR methods. While detailed math and quantum mechanics dealing with NMR theory have been addressed in several well-known NMR volumes, chapter two of this volume illustrates the fundamental principles and concepts of NMR spectroscopy in a more descriptive manner. Topics such as instrument setup, data acquisition, and data processing using a variety of offline software are discussed. Chapters further discuss several routine stategies for preparing samples, especially for macromolecules and complexes. The target market for such a volume includes researchers in the field of biochemistry, chemistry, structural biology and biophysics.

This is the first totally through book on the subject. It covers theory, the instrument, how to run an experiment, the latest in pulse and structure determination methods. The best part is that it’s written as a textbook with questions and goal at the beginning of each section and homework or exam problems. It is ideal for a graduate or advanced undergraduate course on biological NMR.” – Lawrence J. Berliner, University of Denver, Denver, CO, USA “While NMR treatises abound, there exists no single text that provides both the information necessary to understand the experiments and processes, as well as the practical details for their successful implementation. This considerable gap in the literature is now happily bridged by Quincy Teng’s timely contribution. – Gerd N. La Mar, University of California, Davis, CA, USA

NMR Spectroscopy Explained

Initially I wanted to write a review for this book after I finish the whole book. However, since the publication of this book, I have noticed that nobody has ever written a review. I have only finished approximately 400 pages but I want to let people to know that this is clearest exposition on modern nmr spectroscopy I have ever come across. I have read a number of nmr books. These include the following

J.D. Roberts “ABC of FT NMR”
T. Claridge “High Resolution NMR spectroscopy in organic chemistry”
J. Sanders ” Modern benchtop NMR spectroscopy”
H. Friebolin “Basic One- and Two-Dimenionsal NMR”

None of the above is as good as this book. The one that comes close to this is Friebolin’s book. However, it is not as detail and does not cover topics such as operator formalism and density matrix. This book also covers the basic theoretical principles and presented in a very lucid way. I enjoy reading this book tremendously.

It has been almost 2 years since I wrote the initial review. Since then, I have the opportunity to read the whole book a second time. My opinion of this book remains the same. If you really want to understand NMR, you cannot go wrong with this book.

This is the best all around NMR text I have come across. Jacobsen does a great job of explaining the vast array of topics in NMR ranging from the nuclear magnetism and pulse sequences to biological NMR. It is very well written, easy to read and follow, while still going into great amounts of detail. For those who do not enjoy heavy amounts of differential equations and linear algebra, then you will appreciate this book as there is just enough math to aid the written explanations, but not so much as to make your head spin. This book also has one of the best explanations/discussions on multi-dimensional techniques commonly used in organic and biological chemistry. There is one specific area where I find this book is somewhat lacking, the discussion on T1, T2 and NOE which is fairly rudimentary. It is more than sufficient for those new to the topic or working on small molecules, but does not offer much past that in my opinion. Also, if you are looking for a better understanding in solid state NMR, this is not the book for you. I would highly recommend this book for anyone wanting to learn more about NMR.

I have read several books about NMR analyzer and practice, and this book provides by far the most lucid description of essentially all aspects of modern NMR (polarization transfer, coherence selection, cross-relaxation, exchange phenomena, solvent suppression, pulsed field gradients, triple resonance methods, residual dipolar couplings, etcetera). The book begins with a simple vector model, progresses to a product operator description, and toward the end, introduces readers to the density matrix representation. In addition to providing a strong conceptual understanding of pulse sequences and sequence modules (e.g., INEPT, DPFGSE, COSY, NOESY, ROESY, TOCSY, HSQC, HMQC, HMBC), the book also describes practical considerations like hardware, data collection, and data processing. The final chapter of the book describes the application of NMR to structural biology. This chapter might have benefited from a description of modern approaches for probing the dynamics of biological systems (e.g., relaxation dispersion NMR), which are one of the primary strengths of NMR compared to diffraction or microscopy for studies of biological systems. I recommend this book for any NMR user that seeks a greater conceptual understanding of the behavior and manipulation of nuclear spin states (i.e., how their NMR experiments work at the level of the ensemble of nuclear spins), and as a foundation for reading more advanced texts like those by Slichter, Abragam, Ernst, or Levitt.